Randi Berkovsky

Pets can make college transition easier for students away from home

fter students move away and begin a new life in college, many might miss home cooked food or the comfort of their childhood bed. For some, however, the companionship of a furry friend helps make the move and transition to college a bit easier.

Through the constant hustle and bustle of the semester, having a pet can be like an ideal roommate, offering affection and friendship. According to Monica Dangler, director of PAWS Shelter and Humane Society, approximately 50 percent of the shelter’s adoptions are made by students. She said this is mainly because many had pets in their hometowns and want the same type of companionship in college.

New experiences for international students in United States

Some students travel further than others for an education at Texas State. Many Bobcats are only a short drive away from their hometowns, but some crossed borders, oceans and language barriers in order to have the college experiences they always dreamed of in the United States.

The Texan way of life can be a culture shock to many international students. For Thibault Gehin, a 22-year-old finance junior from Mellecey, France, the Lone Star State was overwhelming after only a week in San Marcos because “everything is so big.”

Gehin said every time he goes to campus, it is like a workout. He has been in the U.S.for two years, and was a student at Collin College in Plano before attending Texas State.

New experiences for international students in US

Some students travel further than others for an education at Texas State. Many Bobcats are only a short drive away from their hometowns, but some crossed borders, oceans and language barriers in order to have the college experiences they always dreamed of in the United States.

The Texan way of life can be a culture shock to many international students. For Thibault Gehin, a 22-year-old finance junior from Mellecey, France, the Lone Star State was overwhelming after only a week in San Marcos because “everything is so big.”

Alumnus rescues dog, opens ‘Sinners and Saints’ pub

While pet sitting a black labrador named Bella, Philip Nadeau, Sinners and Saints Bistro and Pub owner and Texas State alumnus, encountered a problem.

After biting a UPS man, Bella was placed in canine incarceration. Nadeau needed a way to raise enough money to free Bella. Thus, the Dirty Dog dish at his restaurant was born.

The hot dog, a beer-boiled sausage topped with slow-cooked pulled pork, house-made green chili macaroni and cheese and Dirty Dog sauce was made and sold to help raise money to free Bella.

After three weeks, all of the money needed to free the dog had been earned. The demand for the hot dogs spurred Nadeau into continuing the food’s sale, as well as creating and introducing new dishes for the residents of San Marcos.

George’s hosts ‘Masquerave’ student dance

Under the dim lights of George’s in the LBJ Student Center and the illumination of neon glow sticks, Texas State students danced the night away to the steady thump of the DJ’s speakers. 

The Student Association for Campus Activities held its Masquerave event Thursday for students to participate in free of charge. 

With the week coming to a close, students got a taste of the weekend festivities to come from the multicolored balloons covering the floor, a bracelet making table, beads to wear and masks to hide their identities on the dance floor.

The masquerade-rave mashup was put on by SACA Assistant Coordinator Shallan Johnson as test to see if she could one day move up to a coordinator position.

Country lovers take the stage at Texas music history concert

After the opening song on the large stage at Texas Music Theater, Gary P. Nunn, one of the founding fathers of progressive country music, let the audience know his passion for music parallels the love he has for his home state.

“You ask me what I like about Texas,” Nunn said. “Well, I could tell you, but we’d be here all night long.”

This love was the foundation for the Center for Texas Music History’s 13th annual Unplugged concert Tuesday night. The free event series started in 2001 through the university’s History Department as a way to educate students and the general public about the unique musical heritage of Texas.

Carnival brings San Marcos children Easter fun

Parents and children anxiously awaited the blow of the air horn with colorful Easter baskets in hand. Their mission: to collect as many eggs as possible from the 12,000 total in the sea of blues, purples, yellows and greens in front of them. 

For 4-year-old Ava Sepaugh, these eggs could be holding her deepest desire of the event—candy canes and jellybeans.

The egg hunt was part of Farmer Fred’s Spring Carnival, which took place at City Park Recreation Hall Thursday as a free event for community members. Organizations from Texas State volunteered to run booths and games for the children including kite flying, a bunny doll dunking booth, face painting and many others.

Texas State students use Facebook to confess secrets anonymously

Confession #1: The creator and administrator of the Texas State Confessions Facebook page is a 20-year-old University of Texas student.

Recently, the Texas State Confessions site has created a buzz that spans the entire campus and now has accumulated more than 7,000 “likes.” Students are able to confess their love for a stranger on the bus, express their opinions about roommates or professors and share strange, embarrassing habits such as addictions and sex fantasies that they would never say otherwise. 

Q&A with Kent Finlay

Every glance at the old pictures and posters on the wall of Cheatham Street Warehouse confirms its role in the country music movement. The neon lights of this honky-tonk warehouse by the railroad tracks that opened in 1974 have been home to the start of big names such as Kyle Park, Randy Rogers and George Strait himself. 

Cheatham Street Warehouse began “Kent Finlay’s Annual 29th Birthday” on Monday with a line-up of artists to last all night. The two-day festivities will continue with another list of those who want to support Finlay, the owner of Cheatham Street Warehouse since its opening nearly four decades ago. Finlay is the owner of the Cheatham Street Music Foundation, which includes Kyle Park, William Clark Green and Sons of Fathers.

Boys and Girls Club hosts Super Bowl festivities

The Boys and Girls Club of South Central Texas brought together friends and family Saturday afternoon to celebrate a love of football. 

The Boys and Girls Club is a non-profit organization meant to help children accomplish their goals and become more self-confident. The club’s fourth annual Super Bowl Family Fun Party included food, games and crafts for youth of all ages. 

The afternoon began with a Madden NFL tournament for children ages 6 and older and was followed by a talent show. The winners of each of these contests received a cash prize with first place receiving $225, second $150 and third $75. 

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