Zach Mayer

Honors College hosts ‘intercultural awareness’ event

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The Honors College hosted a workshop that taught the art of Indian body painting Friday afternoon as part of the Common Experience series.

The president and secretary of the Indian Student Association came to present the body art form, henna, to students. The purpose of the common experience event was to educate and immerse students in different cultures. 

“The goal is to have intercultural awareness, and as much as we would like Texas State students, staff and faculty to learn about our culture, we want to learn about their culture,” said Kanika Verma, Indian Student Association president and geography Ph.D. student. “To prepare students to become a global citizen, you need them to learn other cultures, and you need to have an open mind.” 

Compliments Booth promotes positivity

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Students walking through the LBJ Mall Tuesday morning witnessed their peers standing with signs and yelling compliments at them as they passed by.

The Student Leadership Team’s new Compliments Booth started last semester to cheer up the student body as an expression of social excellence  and enthusiasm.

Ashley Jones, team president and international studies junior, said students are surprised at an organization giving away praises while only expecting a cheerful mood, smile and additional compliment in return.

“It makes us really happy when people come up to us and (ask), ‘Why are you doing this?’ and we’re just like, ‘It’s just to give compliments,’” Jones said.

Archaeology club cooks prehistoric feast

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Students feeling the urge to explore the cultural habits of prehistoric civilizations are given the opportunity through the Experimental Archaeology Club.

Texas State students are given the opportunity to explore the cultural habits of prehistoric civilizations through the Experimental Archaeology Club.

The Experimental Archaeology Club is a group of primarily anthropology students seeking to test the survival habits of 11,000-year-old Texas inhabitants. Club activities include networking, testing pre-historic tools and weapons, and practicing Paleo-American (the ancestors of Native Americans) cooking habits.

Buddhism practiced in campus organization

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Members of the Diamond Way Buddhist Group on campus explore their spirituality every Thursday in the LBJ Student Center.

Sergio Ayala, an anthropology staff specialist and traveling Buddhist teacher, typically gives lessons in Buddhist ways at the meetings. The weekly program is designed to teach people the goal of Buddhism, what it is, and what it is not. 

“Buddhism is one of the major religions that has its basis in experience and one of not really going after numbers,” Ayala said. “People arrive at their own intuitive questions and insights and usually find Buddhism if it’s a right fit for them.” 

Ayala said the religion is not very widespread on campus, but it is fitting to a university environment because of its philosophical basis. 

New organization aims to inspire students

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Some students have taken the stage to express their passions and share ideas through a new student organization.

The organization, Student Theory, had its first event Thursday night in the Centennial Teaching Theater. 

“It’s an organization of the students, by the students and for the students,” said George Walden, founder of Student Theory. 

His idea behind Student Theory is to create a forum similar to T.E.D. Talks for student speakers. Students speak about their passions with the intent to inspire and motivate others. 

Alumna returns to Texas State after living travel dreams

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One Bobcat’s adventure across the pond last summer has inspired her to move back after graduation. 

Lauren Roig, international relations graduate student, interned at the Embassy of the United States in London. Roig spent most of her internship as a commercial assistant, researching British markets for American businesses hoping to export products. This is the business aspect of her love for traveling around the world and meeting new people. 

“I always had a passion for traveling,” Roig said. “I grew up traveling with my parents. I like meeting people from around the world and seeing how we all live our lives.”

Roig plans on moving back to London in the fall after going to Italy during summer to become a dual citizen. 

Students celebrate 50 years of desegregation

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Students, faculty and San Marcos residents enjoyed fellowship, entertainment, free food and an educational and encouraging keynote presentation to celebrate 50 years since desegregation at Texas State.

Approximately 60 people attended the Desegregation Celebration at the Calaboose African American History Museum Saturday afternoon. The event was the second annual desegregation celebration organized by the alliance during Black History Month.
“The theme for the event is history, then and now,” said Darius Jones, communications studies senior and Black Student Alliance president.

Students volunteer to participate in pain, memory study

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Student volunteers are subjecting themselves to some uncomfortable situations to help the Department of Psychology.

The volunteers are test subjects in studies concerning memory and cognitive abilities, including theories related to cognition under stress and pain. 

Brian Tapscott, psychology graduate student, said the study on chronic pain is important because there are millions of Americans suffering from the condition. Tapscott said they are trying to replicate the conditions of chronic pain through a process called ‘cold pressing.’

“We take some ice, put it in a bucket of water, make it really cold, and we have people put their hand or feet in it,” said Joe Etherton, associate professor of psychology. 

Students celebrate 50 years of desegregation

By: 

Students, faculty and San Marcos residents enjoyed fellowship, entertainment, free food and an educational and encouraging keynote presentation to celebrate 50 years since desegregation at Texas State.

Approximately 60 people attended the Desegregation Celebration at the Calaboose African American History Museum Saturday afternoon. The event was the second annual desegregation celebration organized by the alliance during Black History Month.
“The theme for the event is history, then and now,” said Darius Jones, communications studies senior and Black Student Alliance president.

Sandra Mayo, associate professor and director of Multicultural and Gender Studies, was the keynote speaker.

Adventure Club promotes outdoor recreation, campus zombie game

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Among the stresses and demands of college, one group on campus is making fun and adventure a priority.

The Adventure Club was formed by Ryan Elliott, international studies senior, in spring  2011 as a recreational organization to host activities on and off campus. He currently serves as the club’s president.

“We do a whole myriad of events,” Elliott said. “We play capture the flag in The Quad bi-monthly, we go camping (and) we go hiking.” 

Elliot said Adventure Club’s most popular activity is Humans Versus Zombies, derived from an event by a similar group from Goucher College in Towson, Maryland. The activity has attracted a swarm of participants. Approximately 500 students were in the last round.

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