Adriana Ruiz

Mariachi celebration honors Hispanic culture

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The School of Music will close out the year with the sounds of award-winning mariachi.

The Latin Music Studies department will celebrate the 16th annual Feria del Mariachi festival at 7:30 p.m. on May 2 at Strahan Coliseum. John A. Lopez, coordinator of the Latin Music Studies department and associate professor, said the event celebrates the Hispanic culture and influence in San Marcos.

“It is a way to fill the need in San Marcos—to celebrate Hispanic culture through the Mexican art form known as mariachi,” Lopez said.

Photojournalist shares firsthand accounts from Afghan women

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Students attended the Voices of Freedom section of the Philosophy Dialogue Series March 31 to hear from the author of Gathering Strength: Conversations with Afghan Women.

Peggy Kelsey, photojournalist, is the founder of the Afghan Women’s Project. Her goal is to seek wisdom from women who have experienced hardships. During her conversations with students, she discussed sections of her book, which details the lives of individual Afghan women.

New student organization connects electronic music lovers

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“Love, unity and respect” is the motto adopted by a new campus organization striving to promote the San Marcos electronic music scene.  

Abraham Trevino, criminal justice sophomore and president of the Electronic Music Association (EMA), said the group is dedicated to providing students who appreciate electronic music the opportunity to connect and network.

“We want to create a scene for those who might not fit in,” Trevino said.

The organization is still in the beginning stages, but representatives hope it will improve students’ careers by teaching them how to DJ or produce music.

Trevino, who is a DJ, hopes by creating EMA he can help others find themselves.

Elite student dance company performs new recital

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San Marcos is home to performers and dancers, but a company is setting the standard for aspiring professionals.

Michelle Nance, associate professor and co-director of Merge Dance Company, said

the contemporary group is made up of eight dance majors who audition or are recruited to the exclusive team.

The team practices well into the evening hours on a weekly basis, Nance said. Members must be talented and have a good work ethic, she said.

Campus organization treats students to organic makeover

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Avocados, coconut oil and honey were some of the ingredients used to make organic beauty products during the “Treat Yo Self” event hosted by the Student Association for Campus Activities (SACA).

Valerie Gonzalez, public relations senior and coordinator of the activity, said SACA officials like to host events students will enjoy. Officials allow the coordinators to showcase their personalities.

Gonzalez wanted to show students how to make beauty products out of raw organic materials. She said the products help students treat themselves and de-stress before midterms.

“I want to show people how to make products that are not chemically enhanced,” she said.

Zelicks celebrates state independence with Texas-sized party

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A local Texas icehouse celebrated the Lone Star State’s independence with a weekend of tunes, brisket and booze.

Chase Katz, Zelicks owner, said the Texas Independence Day celebration at Zelicks Icehouse is the establishment’s biggest party of the year.

Katz said the celebration included plenty of beer along with 400 pounds of smoked brisket and 18 hours of live music.

The weekend was cold and wet, but Katz said the festivity went on and a great time was had by all.

Longtime barbecue cook turns businessman

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AJ’s Ranch Road Grill is cooking up a name for itself with lunchtime and late-night favorites like Texas Tots and the Texas Philly, a southern take on the classic cheesesteak.

Andrew Napoles, owner and Texas State alumnus, said the idea of opening a restaurant came to him after graduation when he was struggling to find work.

“There wasn’t a lot of options in this area, and I had a hard time looking for a job,” Napoles said. “I always joked that I was going to open up a restaurant.”

The eatery, which is located a five-minute walk from campus, serves traditional barbeque staples like brisket, ribs and pulled pork as well as Tex-Mex favorites like fajitas, tacos and quesadillas.

Hidden gift shop offers vintage furniture, trinkets and more

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Old California license plates, a car jack from the 1920s and various Family Guy DVD’s are just a few of the uncommon items that decorate the walls of Romero’s Junk In Da Trunk shop.

Junk In Da Trunk is a new resale shop tucked away between Vodka Street Bistro and Out of the Blue Salon.

Owner Anthony Romero said he thinks of Junk In Da Trunk as a unique gift store for people who may be difficult to shop for.

“It’s not a thrift store because there is not much clothing and no VHS tapes,” Romero said. “If you got someone that’s hard to shop for, you might find something here.”

The shop is filled with new and old items in various categories such as music, photography, collectables and games.

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