Karen Munoz

Texas State students, faculty weigh in on textbook controversy

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The State Board of Education will approve textbooks in November to be used as part of Texas’ public school curriculum but met with much adversity from constituents. 

The State Board of Education met Sept. 16, to hear testimony from the public regarding concerns about the proposed textbooks to be approved by the board in November. Once approved, the textbooks will be available for use as part of Texas’ curriculum.

Elizabeth Bishop, history associate professor, Holly Doyle, public administration sophomore, and James Carneiro, journalism junior, were three members of the Texas State community among the testifiers.

Tobacco sales remain constant after city prohibits public smoking

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Despite the city- and campus-wide smoking ban, Marvelous Smoke and High Life Glass Works, the smoke shops closest to campus, haven’t seen a difference in tobacco sales since either policy was instated.

Texas State has been a tobacco-free campus since fall 2011. As of Jan. 1 this year, San Marcos denounced public smoking. Smoking on city-owned property is now a Class C Misdemeanor.

Ray Rabie, manager at Marvelous Smoke, said though tobacco purchases haven’t decreased, he has noticed an increase in the sale of e-cigarettes, which aren’t allowed by either policy. 

“(We) have seen an increase in the sale of e-cigs,” Rabie said. “Those are illegal in public places too now, but the demand has increased.”

Final voting begins for Homecoming court

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Lions may reign supreme in the animal kingdom, but Texas State Bobcats take over during Homecoming season.

One of the longest-running annual traditions at the university is the crowning of a king and queen during halftime at the Homecoming game. Homecoming court consists of a king and queen and both a female and male Gaillardian. Thirty royal hopefuls campaign weeks ahead of voting, and then at the Homecoming talent show, six finalists are announced: three potential kings and three potential queens.

To be part of Homecoming court, a student needs to prepare ahead of time to make the final cut. Zac Kruger and Breanna Burton, reigning Homecoming king and queen, have a few ideas about what it takes to hold the position.

Professor to evaluate proposed dam removal

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Thom Hardy, professor and Chief Science Officer of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, discussed his forthcoming Cape’s Dam river evaluations Tuesday at the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board.

Hardy’s evaluation will present objective facts about the setting in which Cape’s Dam exists and the environment around it. His evaluation will especially outline changes in the river channel and the hydraulic environment. He has conducted similar evaluations in the past, but none have focused on the effects recreation has on the river.

Tubers, kayakers, canoers and people floating the river do not cause much harm to the river’s inhabitants, he said. People inside the river cause more harm than floaters do.

San Marcos’ dependence on Edwards Aquifer less than surrounding areas

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In the 1980s, San Marcos was 100 percent dependent on the Edwards Aquifer. Today, that dependency is down to 7 percent.

Edwards Aquifer supplied almost all of the city’s water over 30 years ago. The San Marcos Water Treatment plant, which began operating in January 2000, gave the city another option.

The plant treats surface water, making it drinkable. Contracted by the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority (GBRA), the plant was a $15.5 million project, according to the GBRA website.

The city now gets over 90 percent of its water from Canyon Lake, said City Spokesman Trey Hatt.

The plant supplies 93 percent of the city’s water, said Jon Clack, assistant director of Public Services Water Wastewater.

San Marcos' dependence on Edwards Aquifer less than surrounding areas

By: 

In the 1980s, San Marcos was 100 percent dependent on the Edwards Aquifer . Today, that dependency is down to 7 percent.

Edwards Aquifer supplied almost all of the city’s water over 30 years ago. The San Marcos Water Treatment plant, which began operating in January 2000, gave the city another option.

The plant treats surface water, making it drinkable. Contracted by the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority (GBRA), the plant was a $15.5 million project, according to the GBRA website.

The city now gets over 90 percent of its water from Canyon Lake, said City Spokesman Trey Hatt.

The plant supplies 93 percent of the city’s water, said Jon Clack, assistant director of Public Services Water Wastewater.

Professor to evaluate proposed dam removal

By: 

Thom Hardy, professor and Chief Science Officer of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, discussed his forthcoming Cape’s Dam river evaluations Tuesday at the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board.

Hardy’s evaluation will present objective facts about the setting in which Cape’s Dam exists and the environment around it. His evaluation will especially outline changes in the river channel and the hydraulic environment. He has conducted similar evaluations in the past, but none have focused on the effects recreation has on the river.

Tubers, kayakers, canoers and people floating the river do not cause much harm to the river’s inhabitants, he said. People inside the river cause more harm than floaters do.

Edwards Aquifer Authority launches irrigation suspension program for farmers, ranchers

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A program from the Edwards Aquifer Authority (EAA) aims to conserve water during the drought by offering to pay farmers and ranchers not to irrigate their land. 

The Voluntary Irrigation Suspension Program Option (VISPO) is a way for irrigators to make some money while helping to conserve water.

The EAA has put a plan in place to help decrease the amount of water used by irrigators as part of the Habitat Conservation Plan. The San Marcos area is experiencing Stage 4 water restrictions for the first time due to extreme drought conditions.

The VISPO program is about “reducing demand with cash incentives,” said Rick Illgner, governmental affairs officer at the EAA.

Tour of Pi Kappa Alpha, Delta Zeta houses

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Pi Kappa Alpha’s old house on Belvin Street is somewhat of a San Marcos legend.

After the house burned down in 2007, the fraternity members had to find a new place to call home. After moving around, the fraternity has taken root on Hutchinson Street with a two-year lease.

In addition to the main house where eight members reside, the fraternity has a second property for partying, called “the party house,” located behind the backyard parking lot.

“We’re lucky to have what we have,” said Joe Liska, PIKE brother.

PIKE’s house is “like a big duplex” and features a living room, kitchen, granite countertops, “TVs all over the place,” study areas, futons and common areas, Liska said.

Bobcat Marching Band to perform at Dallas Cowboys halftime

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The Bobcat Marching Band will perform during the halftime show Sept. 28 at the New Orleans Saints vs. Dallas Cowboys football game in Arlington.

On the way home from the Texas State vs. University of Tulsa game, the marching band will make a pit stop at the AT&T Stadium to perform one of the two halftime shows they’ve prepared this season. Kyle Glaser, associate director of bands, said he emailed the Dallas Cowboys’ general information email address explaining the Bobcat Marching Band was interested in performing during halftime at a game.

Glaser said he did not think he would get a response from the Cowboys, but five days later the Cowboys’ head of marketing and special operations contacted him to say they would love to have the marching band perform.

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