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Amazon selects San Marcos as a 'prime' location for new facility

The eighth corporation on Forbes’ list of most innovative companies in the world will host its grand opening in San Marcos next December. 

Amazon is set to open an 850,000-square-foot facility on McCarty Lane, said Adriana Cruz, president of the Greater San Marcos Partnership. She said the operation will bring “economic gain” to the city and provide jobs for hundreds of people.

Kevin Burke, economic and development coordinator for the City of San Marcos, said city officials want to push economic development and competitive enterprise. Amazon’s addition to San Marcos will bring 350 full-time positions with benefits and the possibility of  up to 1,000 positions total. 

Students show up for Alkek 25th anniversary event

The quad was packed Tuesday morning for the celebratory kick-off of Alkek's 25 year anniversary of establishment.
 
Book-it-Brigade involved the formation of a “human chain” consisting of students, faculty and alumni that spanned from the plaza of Old Main to the top steps of Alkek Library. 
 
The event was a reenactment of an event in 1990 that honored the “symbolic move” of the library collection from JC Kellam (JCK) to Alkek on the library’s completion day, said Joan Heath, university librarian. On the day of the original event, books were passed along the human chain which extended from the third floor of JCK to the top steps of the collection’s new permanent home.
 

Woman in custody after running over, killing boyfriend

A San Marcos woman is awaiting magistration on charges of intoxication manslaughter after accidentally running over her boyfriend early this morning, according to police.

Elizabeth Buchanan, 21, was drinking with her boyfriend Joshua Horn, 33, Tuesday night at a local bar and when the two had a disagreement. Horn walked back to their Sagewood Trail residence after their disagreement, according to police.

Early this morning, Buchanan drove home and accidentally ran over Horn in their driveway. Buchanan called police and attempted to use life saving measures to keep Horn alive until police and emergency personnel arrived. 

Horn was pronounced dead at the scene.

Eight17 Lofts to be bought by new owners

Eight17 Lofts has been a half-built eyesore for San Marcos residents since January 2014 when construction appeared to slow down, ultimately coming to a complete halt sometime the following fall.

Students began signing leases to live in the new close-to-campus structure back in September 2013, by February 2014 Innovative Student Housing had delayed move-in dates four times. The Attorney for Students office confirmed Innovative filed for bankruptcy at a consultation meeting in January 2014.

All summer, the structure stood, half complete, with many students and San Marcos natives wondering if it would be knocked down or finished.

San Marcos CISD superintendent makes a 'surprising' resignation

San Marcos Consolidated Independent School District will no longer be under the direction and supervision of Mark Eads after he held four years as the district’s superintendent.

Now the former Superintendent, Eads sent out a statement on Sept. 11 to the Board of Trustees and faculty at San Marcos CISD stating he will be stepping down. Eads’ resignation will be effective Jan. 31 of next year.

Kathy Hansen, active school board president of San Marcos CISD, said Eads stepped down to spend more time with his family, and because the job became too taxing.

“I am so proud to have had the opportunity to be part of such a wonderful organization and to have developed relationships that will continue,” Eads said.

University on the brink of changing commencement policy

Some Texas State parents have been forced to watch their children graduate on a television screen in an overflow room due to overpopulation at commencement ceremonies.

University officials are in the process of modifying graduation requirements for students in order to help alleviate the overpopulation issue. 

Under the current policy, students lacking their final nine hours of credit may still walk the stage at graduation, said Kristin McDaniel, commencement coordinator. The rule is being reviewed by the Council of Deans and has to make it through a review process before it can be changed.

River Inspired Student Effort

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San Marcos CISD superintendent makes a 'surprising' resignation

San Marcos Consolidated Independent School District will no longer be under the direction and supervision of Mark Eads after he held four years as the district’s superintendent.

Now the former Superintendent, Eads sent out a statement on Sept. 11 to the Board of Trustees and faculty at San Marcos CISD stating he will be stepping down. Eads’ resignation will be effective Jan. 31 of next year.

Kathy Hansen, active school board president of San Marcos CISD, said Eads stepped down to spend more time with his family, and because the job became too taxing.

“I am so proud to have had the opportunity to be part of such a wonderful organization and to have developed relationships that will continue,” Eads said.

Local poverty rates cause concern amid growing student body, development

As San Marcos grows and continues to attract large corporations, some residents fear the economic disparity between the middle class and poverty will increase.

Stephanie Foster, Texas State graduate student and researcher at the Texas Municipal Courts Education Center, said she foresees conflicting interests as development increases.

“By growth in population, poor neighborhoods are starting to exhibit some sign of evolution,” Foster said. “The backlash of the development will make the neighborhood expensive and then poor people have to move out.”

According to U.S. Census Bureau, the average income per capita, in past 12 months of 2013, in San Marcos has been $15,916, while people in Austin have earned nearly twice their neighbor town ($31,990).

New policy for teaching theaters to be implemented

As freshman enrollment numbers rise, university professors increasingly seek out teaching theaters.

University officials formed a committee to determine which core curriculum courses will be scheduled to conduct class in the theater facilities in Alkek, Centennial Hall and the LBJ Student Center for the next two years.  The committee is comprised of several department chairs from the university, said Mary Brennan, chairperson for the history department’s council of chairs.

Teaching theaters for core curriculum classes such as English, political science, math and natural science are in high demand since they are required classes for freshman and will inevitably have more students per class, said Sheri Mora, associate chair of the political science department.

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